Is Going Barefoot in Public Good for Your Health?




The Doctors welcome podiatrist Dr. Alireza Khosroabadi to discuss whether the going barefoot trend is good for your health or possibly harmful. Subscribe to …

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Is Going Barefoot in Public Good for Your Health?

Comments 25

  1. How many times do you want to patronise us by referring to barefoot walking as a trend? Read all the comments below. There are people that have been doing it for 6 months and there are people that have been doing it since the 60s. Until you're prepared to balance your arguments and provide suitable research, please stop stating your opinion as fact. Some idiots might actually believe you. I'll carry on being trendy thanks.

  2. So wait… He advocates that it's necessary to build the muscles, especially for children, then says it's a bust…? The fuck? The way he even said it sounds as if he was basically paid to say that.

  3. I was a 50’s kid/60’s teen, with a lot of barefooting going in during those 2 decades along with the 70’. Once when I was 13, I picked up the planter wart virus and developed quite an impressive crop of them. So after several walks along the railroad tracks, the warts became filled with black oil off the track ties – which in turn hurt like H. But the pain left after a couple of days, along with every single last one of the warts. Just like that, gone. And they never returned. The 80’s turned everyone into germaphobes and now people are too soft, without the antibodies or any other kind of resistance to ward off anything unwanted.

  4. "I don't want those women to stop wearing those stilettos." Seriously?! Do you have any idea how much damage those stilettos do to a woman's feet?

    What about all that stuff they talked about getting onto the soles of someone's feet? Does it not also get onto the soles of their shoes? Does it all magically disappear when they go home or get into their car? For you germophobes, consider this: Unless you're washing your flip flops or sandals regularly, the bacteria that builds up on them can include e-Coli. How 'bout that!

    They make it sound like in the caveman days there were no bad things like viruses, urine, or feces anywhere. Really?! What's changed? Nothing really. Your feet are designed to protect you from the environment. Encasing them in shoes only causes the muscles and tendons to atrophy to the point where your feet are very weak. Shoe-obsessed Americans spend LOTS of money going to the foot doctor. Are those shoes really helping?

    Sooooo…leave the shoes off as much as you can. In the long run, it's WAY healthier.

  5. What a fantastic one-sided hit job! I don't wear shoes for health, safety, and religious reasons. Why doesn't Dr. Khosroabadi use the same reasons to tell people to wear gloves all the time, especially during flu and cold season? Why didn't you have someone on to share the benefits of being barefoot and the numerous studies that prove it? Oh wait, you did. You did the interviews, you have the footage, you just refused to air it. My podiatrist would have ripped Dr. Khosroabadi apart with numerous studies that scientifically refute everything he's saying. You know why your feet hurt at the end of the day and mine don't? It's because your shoes are destroying your feet slowly. Cavemen had stronger feet because they didn't have shoes to destroy them. You can find this out after a couple months of being barefoot, or by visiting a third world country where people have the healthiest feet according to studies.

  6. This is catering to widespread ignorance about bare feet, in both the general public and the medical profession – at least in the United States of America. Every known foot problem not caused by a birth defect or serious injury is caused by shoes. Here's an idea, how about comparing the foot of a person who has never worn shoes, or has worn shoes (and does not have the horribly deformed toes of a person who has basically worn shoes almost all their life), but now rarely wears shoes, versus a person who has worn shoes almost all their life. Chances are, it would go something like this: The person who had never worn shoes would have wide, evenly spaced toes; the person who formerly wore shoes (but did not have horribly deformed feet from wearing shoes) but now rarely wears them would have toes with an obvious gap between each toe (though not as wide as the person who never wore shoes, for obvious reasons); and the person who has worn shoes almost all of their life will have horribly deformed feet – toes that are squashed together with no gap in between each toe, with the toes forming a triangle – which is not the natural shape of any healthy human foot. Anyone who has ever seen the feet of a woman who constantly wears high heels (or conversely, of a man who constantly wears pointed toe 'dress' shoes) knows exactly what I am talking about. Another problem caused by shoes in addition to the obvious (at least to well informed podiatrists and people who have stopped wearing shoes because of problems caused by them), such as Athlete's Foot, Plantar Fasciitis, and bunions, is something I like to call "Marshmallow Foot Syndrome", which is universal among anyone who almost never goes barefoot. It is so named because a marshmallow exposed to fire (like the sole of a human foot exposed to heat and friction from walking barefoot, which is normal) thickens (not hardening into callouses) where the skin is exposed to such conditions, but a marshmallow that is protected from fire (like the sole of a human foot that has never gone barefoot and hasn't adapted to walking without shoes) is (unnaturally) soft and vulnerable to puncture from sharp objects – like broken glass, gravel, pebbles, plant spikes (thorns) and or spiked plant seeds, etc., blisters from simply walking on a hard surface (even if it is not hot), and excessive burns (third-degree burns) from standing or walking on a hot surface (like sand, concrete, asphalt, rocks, or dirt) – none of which is not a problem for people who have never worn shoes, or have stopped wearing shoes. If shoes are so much better, then why do people who have never worn shoes (or stopped wearing shoes) not suffer (or stop suffering from) from Athlete's Foot, Plantar Fasciitis, bunions, toes squashed together; deformed into a triangle like the shape of a shoe, and Marshmallow Foot Syndrome, where walking barefoot on any surface results in excessive pain and unnecessary cuts and punctures in the sole of the foot, which can become infected inside of a shoe and lead to amputation? Any well informed podiatrist would say exactly what I and others have said and been saying for years that shoes weaken and destroy the human foot, which can "then" only be "fixed" with expensive (and unnecessary) "arch support orthotics" and "corrective surgeries", none of which would be necessary if people only wore shoes when absolutely necessary (such as a when in chemical plant where caustic acid is present, protection from extreme cold, or any other rare circumstances where wearing shoes actually protects the foot from unnecessary damage from such hazards). This is the medical equivalent of saying that asbestos isn't dangerous when there is clear evidence to the contrary. This is as bad as bicycle advocates telling Vehicular Cyclists that not following the rules of the road is safer than following the rules of the road, and using "infrastructure" (bike lanes and sidewalk-like paths adjacent to a roadway with lots of intersections and driveways) to reinforce such ignorance despite evidence showing ill informed cyclists being killed by "infrastructure" that violates the normal rules of the road. Vehicular Cyclists, for obvious reasons, rarely (almost never) have crashes because they are following the rules of the road and being safe – in much the same way that barefooters don't (or stop suffering from) problems caused by shoes. Both problems are caused by ignorance that is supported by the masses (and 'professionals' in the respective fields, who are a disgrace to the true professionals who don't believe and propagate such ignorance just so they can make money) and only opposed by those who know otherwise and are actively fighting such ignorance.

    Giovannte Sims
    Tuesday, September 18th, 2018
    6:11 P.M. Central Standard Time (CST)

  7. This a comment from a podiatrist, Stephen Bloor, who is also a barefooter and incorporates it into his practice in the UK:
    Too many subconscious biases in the medical experts minds to permit them to consider the benefits.

    And they are over-exaggerating the risks.

    And they are totally, absolutely, ignoring the huge risks of wearing footwear.

    From an infection risk, the incubating effect with enclosed footwear far outweighs the risks of going barefoot, when it comes to bacterial and fungal infections.

    And the risk of mechanical foot, lower-limb and low back problems is massively increased, from handicapping their normal foot functions with stiff shoes.

    Let alone the reduction in sensation from covering the skin and creating an artificial neuropathic gait.

    Etc, etc, etc

    Sadly, my medical colleagues in this TV programme are blinded by their cognitive biases.

    I used to be too.

  8. this horrible mess of a debate (biased really) i would often ask myself where to begin on explaining stupid things like this…but i think instead ill start YOU off here: http://www.barefooters.org/

    i gave up shoes at 25 and so i have been a full-time barefooter for 2½ years now and i plan on being a full-time barefooter for the rest of my life 🙂 i happily burned my only pair of shoes at the time because i was sick of being afraid of conformity/judgment but i was sick and tired of feeling uncomfortable and getting athletes foot on a near daily basis because of shoes
    when i was a teenager my feet would be completely white (dead skin) and i had to be VERY careful peeling my socks off and when i did i saw a few times how they felt just like sandpaper and you could hold them on their side…never, EVER again…i refuse to respect myself any less now!

  9. Too many subconscious biases in the medical expert's minds to permit them to consider the benefits.

    And they are over-exaggerating the risks.

    And they are totally, absolutely, ignoring the huge risks of wearing footwear.

    From an infection risk, the incubating effect with enclosed footwear far outweighs the risks of going barefoot, when it comes to bacterial and fungal infections.

    And the risk of mechanical foot, lower-limb and low back problems is massively increased, from handicapping their normal foot functions with stiff shoes.

    Let alone the reduction in sensation from covering the skin and creating an artificial neuropathic gait.

    Etc, etc, etc

    Sadly, my medical colleagues in this TV programme are blinded by their cognitive biases.

    I used to be too.

    https://naturalfeet.wordpress.com/2017/09/06/interview-with-podiatrist-and-barefoot-advocate-steve-bloor/

  10. Completely biased and unobjective segment. Every argument against bare feet in unconventional places can be biologically, scientifically, or practically refuted except one-and that is the emotional argument. Even when presented with fact, an emotional argument is extremely difficult to overcome. I agree with Steve, an advocate should have been included in the discussion. And any podiatrist who doesn’t understand the resilience of a healthy human foot needs to have his/her credentials questioned.

  11. Going barefoot anywhere and everywhere is good for your physical and mental health period. I go barefoot wherever I go. Unlike shoe wearers, I watch where I step AND I clean my feet several times a day. How often do you clean your shoes? So who is tracking what around, me? Or you?

  12. This segment was very biased and didn’t have one barefoot advocate representing it. These doctors basically share the same “opinion” as general people in the streets. It would be nice if the doctors could detach from their societal views and look more objectively at this topic. Please visit Barefoot is Legal or the Society for Barefoot Living websites for the other side of the story.

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